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Alveolodental ankylosis and subsequent replacement resorption: Can osseointegrated implants be placed in the same location?

Alberto Consolaro

Teeth with alveolodental ankylosis naturally evolve to replacement resorption. Provided that they remain free of microbial contamination, these teeth should be considered in the bone context as one more structure that should undergo continuous remodeling. Continuous remodeling is one of the most remarkable characteristics of bone biology, given that it is responsible for keeping blood calcium, as well as other minerals essential to life, levels stable. Another consequence of alveolodental ankylosis is the gradual infraocclusion of the affected tooth. Provided that free of microbial contamination, the areas of bone with root or root fragments undergoing replacement resorption can remain in the sites where surgical sockets are prepared to receive osseointegrated implants which shall not hinder the process of peri-implant bone repair also known as osseointegration. In the event of being contaminated by bacteria and their byproducts, the root structure should be eliminated. The remaining site should be further assessed to indicate potential corrections of volume and shape.

Keywords: Replacement resorption. Alveolodental ankylosis. Osseointegrated implants. Tooth resorption.

How to cite: Consolaro A. Alveolodental ankylosis and subsequent replacement resorption: Can osseointegrated implants be placed in the same location? Dental Press Implantol. 2014 JulySept;8(3):10-4. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.14436/2237-650X.8.3.010-014.exp

Tuesday, October 17, 2017 16:42